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The Evolution of Humor: If Human Have Sense Of Humor, So IsThe Animals

How often do you laugh? When we heard a joke, our brain reacts into an incredible laughter. Speech and laughter coerce. Yet little neural representation is known about brain mechanism of magical laughter. Since human are normal to laugh and crack a joke, animals have also a way to display their laughter. According to MIT Technology Review published article on The Evolutionary Origin of Laughter, Pedro Marijuan and Jorge Navarro of the Institute Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud, Spain says that laughter is intimately linked with the evolution of human brain. It is believed that brain evolved rapidly at the same as human group sizes increased.

However, animals have sense humor as well. Another published research article by Slate.com, The Humor Code. The research is done in a closed and high-security research lab in Northwestern University’s Folk Center for Molecular Therapeutics, scientists are tickling rats. Their goal is to create a pharmaceutical-grade happiness pill. Scientists believe human laughter does not evolve around to human but animals too. Laughter evolved in our relative ancestors great-ape, who are panting during rough and tumble play. That panting functions set as a signal that the play is all in good fun and nobody’s about to tear anybody else’s throat out. Psychologist Marina Davila Ross of University of Portsmouth, UK analyze digital recordings of tickle induced panting from chimps, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans. There is also a viral video uploaded to YouTube that a girl can make dolphins laugh by doing repeated cartwheels and handstands in front of its tank at a sea world centre.

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